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SPRING 2017 COURSES

100 Level Courses

  • ENGL 191: The World of Language II
  • ENGL 190: The World of Language I
  • ENGL 110: Composition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 100: Composition
  • SPCH 100: Public Communication

200 Level Courses

  • ENGL 291: Introduction to Writing Creative Essays
  • ENGL 273: Introduction to Creative Writing–Poetry
    • This introductory-level course is designed for those who scribble poems in private and those who want to try their hands at poetry for the first time. The emphasis will be on finding inspiration, trying new ways of writing, learning how readers interpret what we put on paper, and crafting poems so that our intended meaning gets across. This is a “workshop” course, so the bulk of our work will be writing poems and commenting on our classmates’ poems. Other assignments may include brief readings, one or two short written analyses, and memorizing a favorite poem.
  • ENGL 271: Introduction to Creative Writing–Fiction
  • ENGL 261: Black Literature–Twentieth Century
  • ENGL 233: Issues in World Literature
    • Topic: Poetry of Resistance: “Literature,” Ezra Pound argued, “is the news that stays news.” “Hip hop,” Chuck D insists, “is the CNN of the ghetto.” More recently, poets and artists have played key roles in social justice groups like Black Lives Matter and La Raza. This class will explore contemporary and modern poets from Venezuela, Zimbabwe, the United States, China, Palestine, and Ireland who use form and content to talk back to governments, the status quo, and institutionalized power with their work. We will look at these and other intersections of art and activism from around the world to examine how art can become a form of political resistance.
  • ENGL 226: Grammar and Usage of Standard English
  • ENGL 210: Introduction to Literature
  • SPCH 210: Interpersonal Communication

300 Level Courses

  • ENGL 398: Journalism Internship
  • ENGL 393E: Technical Communication for ESL Students
  • ENGL 393: Technical Communication
  • ENGL 392: Tutorial in Writing
  • ENGL 391: Advanced Exposition and Argumentation
  • ENGL 385: New Media and Digital Literacies
  • ENGL 383: Science Writing
    • Science writers translate research results into lively compelling prose. In this course students will read journal articles; interview scientists; draft and revise news articles, essays and features; and use social media to cover science stories. We will also explore the ethical, social, and political issues raised by media coverage of the environment, science, and medicine.
  • ENGL 382: Feature Writing
  • ENGL 375: Masterworks for Creative Writers
    • Topic: Langston Hughes: From the Harlem Renaissance and Beyond: In honor of the fifty-year anniversary of Langston Hughes’s passing, this course will explore the poetry and prose of one of America’s most prolific and influential authors. By examining texts such as The Weary Blues (1926), Not Without Laughter (1930), and the Simple stories, we can gain better insight into the socio-cultural issues that African-American authors sought to tackle when the Negro was in vogue. Students in this course will not only reflect critically on the works of Hughes—the poet laureate of Harlem—but also creatively, constructing their own work across genres, inspired by Hughes’s artistic and intellectual approach.
  • ENGL 373: Creative Writing–Poetry
    • This course is designed for students with prior experience in writing poetry (273: Introduction to Creative Writing, Poetry). We will be reading, writing, and responding critically to poems; reading essays on craft; and learning to perceive, draft, and revise in a creative and disciplined way. Be prepared to “live like a writer” and practice the consistent habits of a working artist on our own and in workshop.
  • ENGL 360: The Literature of Minorities
  • ENGL 326: The Structure of English
  • ENGL 324: Theories of Communication and Technology
  • ENGL 321: Internship in Tutoring Writing
  • ENGL 317: Literature and the Sciences
    • Topic: Diagnosing Gender: Scientists have long sought to define biological determinants of gender as gender non-conforming people have consistently called those definitions into question. In this course we will read first person accounts by trans* and intersexed persons from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century, including Ralph Werther (Autobiography of an Androgyne), Aleshia Brevard (The Woman I Was Not Born to Be), Max Wolf Valerio (The Testosterone Files), Julia Serano (Whipping Girl), and Janet Mock (Redefining Realness). We will also examine the work of pioneering nineteenth and twentieth century sexologists whose studies led to the contemporary understanding of sex, gender, and sexual orientation.
  • ENGL 308: American Literature: The Civil War to 1945
    • Topic: American Literary Realisms: Realism was the principal mode of American literature after the Civil War and is still arguably the dominant mode of literature, film, and television today. This course will examine the many varieties of American literary realism from the late nineteenth through the twentieth century, looking at middle class realism, documentary realism, social or proletarian realism, the realism of the Harlem Renaissance, and the great variety of realisms created by immigrant and minority authors. Possible authors include Henry James, Edith Wharton, John Dos Passos, Willa Cather, Tillie Olsen, Jessie Fauset, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, Julia Alvarez as well as some films.
  • ENGL 307: American Literature: From New World Contact to the Civil War
    • Topic: Transgressing Boundaries: This course will center on literature of the early U.S.  from 1776 to 1860. Our two key terms transgressing and boundaries are broadly defined, referencing how literature of the early republic frequently centered on geographic border crossings and generic experimentation, as well as themes of moral, religious, social, and political boundaries and transgressions. We will consider how writers troubled the boundaries of race and ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality and questioned the legal and moral constitution of the “transgressive.” Authors may include Charles Brockden Brown, Phillis Wheatley, Hannah Webster Foster, Catherine Maria Sedgwick, William Apess, Margaret Fuller, William Wells Brown, and Herman Melville.
  • ENGL 306: British Literature: Victorian and Modern
    • Topic: Literature and Capitalism: How does the literary imagination respond to the impact of capitalism on culture, politics, ethics, social relations, and the individual? This course is structured around three key fictional texts: Charles Dickens’s Hard Times (1854) that examines society under nineteenth-century industrial capitalism, George Orwell’s Animal Farm (1945) that critiques twentieth-century revolutionary struggles against capitalism, and Anne Enright’s The Forgotten Waltz (2011) that addresses the global recession of 2008 as spiritual crisis. We will also explore capitalism’s impact on the artist, the environment, and class and gender relations in Tennyson, Browning, G.M. Hopkins, T.S. Eliot, D, H. Lawrence, Philip Larkin, and Carol Ann Duffy.
  • ENGL 304: British Literature: Medieval and Renaissance
    • Topic: The Age of Chaucer: Focusing on literary works from the age of Chaucer, this course will cover the moving dream-vision/elegy Pearl, the Chester mystery play Noah’s Flood (including Noah’s rebellious wife), and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. How did Chaucer’s cultural formation and diplomatic travels to Europe shape the complex interplay of voices, discourses, and genres in this poem, from racy tavern tale to miracle story to folk tale to church satire? Why did this son of a London wine-merchant set out to write an English pilgrimage poem in dialogue with the writings of Boccaccio and Dante? Why was writing only in English a radical choice?
  • ENGL 303: Art of the Essay
    • This course examines and practices the art and craft of writing and reading contemporary essays, including personal, research-based, and formally inventive essays. Be prepared to “live like a writer” and practice the consistent habits of a working artist on our own and in workshop.
  • ENGL 302: Literary Methodologies and Research
  • ENGL 301: Analysis of Literary Language
  • ENGL 300: Communication and Technology: Analysis of Texts and Contexts

400 Level Courses

  • ENGL 499: Senior Honors Project
  • ENGL 495: Internship
  • ENGL 493: Seminar in Communication and Technology
    • Topic: Baltimore, Race, Rhetoric, and Technology: What does The Negro Motorist’s Handbook, a travel guide published during the Jim Crow era, have to do with the 2015 Baltimore uprising? Why do some in Baltimore have a life expectancy that is 14 years shorter than others in different areas of the city? How does physical mobility affect the economic lives of those living in Baltimore? Questions like these will motivate this course. We will take a historical perspective that aims to unravel the complex intersections among rhetoric, race, and technology in the United States so that we can better understand Baltimore today. Consequently, we will examine how race was constructed rhetorically and technologically not only from the abolition of slavery through the Civil Rights Movement but also in the digital era through apps like Twitter and YouTube.
  • ENGL 481: Seminar in Advanced Journalism
    • Topic: Deadline Artist: America’s story has been best told in newspapers. From the local and mundane–—crime blotters and crop prices—to the Federalist Papers and Watergate, the press has played an outsized role in the nation’s culture and history. This course explores the power of the newspaper column, an inspiration for a new generation of writers—whether their medium is print or digital—looking to learn from the best of their predecessors, including Damon Runyon, Grantland Rice, Eleanor Roosevelt, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, H.L. Mencken, Maureen Dowd, and Anna Quindlen.
  • ENGL 471: Advanced Creative Writing–Fiction
  • ENGL 464: Studies in Women and Literature
    • Topic: Women in Medieval Literature and Culture: A time of silence for women? This course focuses on medieval medical and cultural views of women and the debate over their spiritual, intellectual, and physical “deficiencies.”  We will read Anglo-Saxon female saints’ lives and a Beguine mystic, Mechthild of Magdeburg’s erotic visionary work.  We will consider the vexed issues of textuality and power in the love letters between Peter Abelard and his pupil Heloise. Asking whether and how medieval feminine agency and subjectivity were even possible, we will examine acts of female initiative, defiance, and conformity in Chretien de Troyes’ romances, Boccaccio’s racy Decameron, Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, and Christine de Pizan’s Vision.
  • ENGL 448: Seminar in Literature and Culture
    • Topic: “Scribbling Women” and the American Periodical: Many of the early United States’ most influential women writers first published their work in American newspapers and magazines. These writers—whom Nathaniel Hawthorne notoriously labeled “a damned mob of scribbling women”—were crafting serial novels, advocating abolition and enfranchisement, discussing fashion and child-rearing, agitating for laborers’ rights, and provoking political debate in the space of the periodical. This course will consider how periodical writers harnessed this print medium’s distinctive potential to challenge conceptions of womanhood and experiment with literary form. Authors may include Judith Sargent Murray, Margaret Fuller, Pauline Hopkins, Louisa May Alcott, Ida B. Wells, and Zitkala-Ša.
  • ENGL 415: Materials for Teaching Reading
  • ENGL 414: Adolescent Literature
  • ENGL 411: Advanced Topics in Literary History
    • Topic: Literature and Colonization: Our objective in this course is to understand how authors struggle to represent not only the complex justifications for colonization but also the injustices and the ethical cost of conquest and exploitation. First we will cover narratives written by enthusiastic participants in the European colonizations of the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries, narratives often justifying oppression, enslavement, and even extermination of the native peoples of conquered lands. Then we will jump to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to examine works written by inheritors of the latter-day empires, analyzing authors’ mixture of nationalistic pride, uneasiness, and bitter triumph as their countries’ world dominance declines.
  • ENGL 407: Language in Society
  • ENGL 405: Seminar in Literary HIstory
    • Topic: Romanticism’s First Family: This course will explore the family dynamic of one of the most notorious literary families (Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, and the Shelleys) in the Romantic age, reading their prose and poetry in the context of the family unit in which they were created. What these four major figures in Romanticism shared beyond their family connection was a deep and abiding belief in the power of the written word as a political tool, as one of the purest forms of the expression of love, and as a profound source of comfort in a time of need.
  • ENGL 400: Special Projects in English